We have kept the wind and rain gauges separate deliberately due to practical considerations. These two measuring instruments have different requirements in terms of their ideal positioning, and they might interfere with each other.

In the case of Raincrop, users need to look for a place with little wind, where the station can be positioned so that it is level. For the Windcrop, they need to find values reflecting extremes of wind speed (hillsides, valleys etc.) and/or close to sensitive areas (e.g. damp zones, water sources) in order to estimate the risk of dispersal of pesticides during spraying.

The objective of separating the rain and wind gauges into two distinct stations is therefore to respond as well as possible to the needs of the farmer, while leaving room for manoeuvre. It also makes it easier to move the equipment around if desired.

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